Monster Hunter Nation

Writers should be Cultural Appropriating all the Awesome Stuff

So “Cultural Appropriation” for writers has been in the news again lately.

First there was this dim bulb having a freak out because the keynote speaker at a writing conference dared talk about how silly the concept of Cultural Appropriation is. This is an incredibly boring and long winded freak out. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/sep/10/as-lionel-shriver-made-light-of-identity-i-had-no-choice-but-to-walk-out-on-her

(the best part is how she got up and walked away from this dangerous offensive badthink talk AND ALL EYES WERE UPON HER JUDGING HER BY THEIR CULTURAL NORMS! When in reality most folks probably just thought she needed to use the toilet or something)

And here is the actual keynote speech which caused all that outrage: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/sep/13/lionel-shrivers-full-speech-i-hope-the-concept-of-cultural-appropriation-is-a-passing-fad

You should read this. She makes some excellent points. This is coming from the Literati side of the writing world, but it is just as bad over in the exploding space ships and magic elves section of the book store.

I’ve talked about Cultural Appropriation before, and why it is one of the most appallingly stupid ideas every foisted on the gullible in general, and even worse when used as a bludgeon against fiction authors.

First off, what is “Cultural Appropriation”?  From the linked talk:

The author of Who Owns Culture? Appropriation and Authenticity in American Law, Susan Scafidi, a law professor at Fordham University who for the record is white, defines cultural appropriation as “taking intellectual property, traditional knowledge, cultural expressions, or artifacts from someone else’s culture without permission. This can include unauthorised use of another culture’s dance, dress, music, language, folklore, cuisine, traditional medicine, religious symbols, etc.”

The part that got left out of that definition is that engaging in Cultural Appropriation is a grievous mortal sin that self-righteous busy bodies can then use to shame anyone they don’t like.

Look at that definition. Basically anything you use that comes from another culture is stealing. That is so patently absurd right out the gate that it is laughable. Anybody who has two working brain cells to rub together, who hasn’t been fully indoctrinated in the cult of social justice immediately realizes that sounds like utter bullshit.

If you know anything about the history of the world, you would know that it has been one long session of borrowing and stealing ideas from other people, going back to the dawn of civilization. Man, that cuneiform thing is pretty sweet. I’m going to steal writing. NOT OKAY! CULTURAL APPROPRIATION!

Everything was invented by somebody, and if it was awesome, it got used by somebody else. At some point in time thousands of years ago some sharp dude got sick of girding up his loins and invented pants. We’re all stealing from that guy. Damn you racists and your slacks.

This is especially silly when white guilt liberals try to enforce it on Americans, the ultimate crossroads of the world, melting pot country where hundreds of cultures have been smooshed together for a couple hundred years, using each other’s cool stuff and making it better.

This weekend I painted miniatures for a war game from Spain, played a video game from Belarus, listened to rap music from a white guy from Detroit, watched a cop show from Britain, had Thai food for lunch, and snacked on tikki masala potato chips, while one daughter streamed K dramas, another read manga, and my sons played with Legos invented in Denmark.

A life without Cultural Appropriation would be so incredibly boring.

And most of you missed the really insidious part of that that academic, all-consuming definition. Without Permission… Think about that. So how does that work exactly? Who do you ask? Sure, these new Lays Tikki Masala chips are delicious, but are they problematic? Who is the head Indian I’m supposed to get permission from? Did you guys like appoint somebody, or is it an elected position, or what? Or should I just assume that Lays talked to that guy already for me? Or can any regular person from India be offended on behalf of a billon people?

This is all very confusing.

But hang on… India owes me. That’s right. Because vindaloo is a popular Indian dish, but wait! It was actually Culturally Appropriated from the Portuguese hundreds of years ago. I’m Portuguese! I didn’t give them permission to steal the food of my people!

So we will call it even on these chips.

And don’t get me started on Thai food, because the Portuguese introduced the chili pepper to Thailand. YOU ARE WELCOME, WORLD!

Some angry SJW recently assaulted a white kid with dreadlocks for Cultural Appropriation. Sure, he looks like a hippy doofus, but dozens of cultures, including a bunch from Europe have worn dreads. There are only so many ways you can grow hair. So half the time the when the Cultural Appropriation police freak out about something, they’re just being ignorant anyway.

SJWs got up in arms about white people wearing kimonos. That’s racist! But apparently they didn’t check to see if the Chief Japanese Guy had given permission first, because all of the Japanese kimono makers were like “Whoa, hold on there! These are just clothes. We like selling them to people. That’s how we live.” They tried the same thing with tacos, because eating tacos was racist. Which came as shock to all the Mexicans who sell tacos for a living (because tacos are proof God loves us and wants us to be happy) but shut up, actual people with skin in the game, SJWs are speaking for you now!

I think those misunderstandings illustrate the importance of a culture appointing one particular person for us to ask permission from, because otherwise you could have a culture with millions of people in it, and anything is bound to offend somebody… Tread carefully, or I’ll demand vindaloo back.

But how does this relate to writing fiction?

Basically there are a group self-appointed thought police who are just looking for a reason to bitch at authors, and scaring people into falling in line makes them feel important. They use Cultural Appropriation like a hammer to bash authors. In reality these people are basically useless, and can be ignored (or better, mocked) but many authors don’t realize that or they don’t like confrontation. So they self-censor and stifle their creativity to avoid giving offense.

Except you can’t avoid offending the perpetually offended.

Check out that first link if you want to get a good look into the culture warriors’ mindset. They’ve got this weird belief that if you tell a story about Person X, then you are robbing a real life Person X of their ability to tell that story. Like if a white guy tells a story about a teenage Nigerian girl, then a teenage Nigerian girl can no longer tell her story. Okay… Is there like a secret checklist at publishing houses I don’t know about? Sorry, Abegunde, this story is awesome, but we’ve already reached our quota on Nigerian YA for the year.

(Luckily for her, Abegunde can just go indy now!)

In the world of fiction, the SJW is constantly perched, like a falcon, ready to swoop in and shriek Cultural Appropriation at any author who dares transgress. So if you write about another culture you don’t belong to, and they don’t like you for some reason, they’re going to flip out. They’ll probably write mean reviews, form an angry twitter mob of rainbow haired Trigglypuffs, and call you names.

Ignore them. Or better, if you have the mindset and a career capable of withstanding their slander, mock them for their bullying stupidity. Bullies hate being laughed at.

If writers were limited to writing about people just like themselves, fiction would be incredibly boring. We are professional liars. Our job is to make up entertaining stuff. If we were that limited fiction would get really lame, really fast, because most authors are actually pretty dull. Sure, we write about heroic people in interesting situations, but most of us spend our days sitting in a chair in front of a keyboard, eating chips, and that’s boring as shit to read about.

Now, if you’re going to write about another culture, then you need to do your homework and try to make that as real and interesting as possible. But screwing that up doesn’t make you racist. It just makes you a bad writer. Get good, scrub. This doesn’t just apply to writing real cultures either. It is a question of basic world building. If you build an interesting culture that makes sense to the reader and feels real, score. You did your job.

Characters are the same. Liven your characters up. Give them likes and dislikes, give them traits, give them opinions, beliefs, hobbies, whatever. Make them people.  Make them interesting. That’s what really matters.

This whole bullshit about how an author has to “respect” a character if they’re a different culture… Bullshit. That character works for me. That character is going to fill whatever roll in the story I created that character to fill. Every culture has heroes, villains, victims, geniuses, morons, saints, and clowns.

If you’re not part of the cool kids crowd, and you write about a member of a “marginalized group” then they expect you to treat that character like an absolute saint, because otherwise the SJWs will swoop in to screech at you. This is why if you write a female character who is flawed somehow, somebody is going to accuse you of misogyny. Get used to it. The other option is perfect characters, and perfect characters are boring.

The key is writing good characters, period. Getting hung up on an artificial checklist is just bullshit. Make your characters interesting and give them an interesting story, entertain your readers, then laugh at the inevitable haters who are too hung up on minutia and agonizing over rules to create any art themselves.

Notice that this Cultural Appropriation thing only ever goes one way. Take for example a prog author who has never touched a gun, but apparently it is okay for them to write the gun culture. Usually as illiterate redneck Bubbas out murdering school children. Totally legit. Or take a goodthink peacenik author who has never served a day in the military, and they can write their blood thirsty, ticking time bombs of PTSD addled murder rage, and that’s perfectly cool. Christians? All up in your literature, as long as they are bad guys.

We don’t hate characters like that because they are appropriating our culture. We hate them because they are lame, boring stereotypes written out of obvious lazy ignorance. Quit sucking and you’ll sell more books.

Look, if you’re an aspiring author and this Cultural Appropriation nonsense has scared you away from writing what you want to write, you’ve bought into their con. Screw that. Write what you want to write. Because here is the ugly secret, no matter what you do, if they don’t like you or they get a bug up their ass about you, they’re going to attack you somehow anyway.

So you don’t write about any other cultures other than the one you come from because you are scared you’ll be committing Cultural Appropriation?  Okay. But then they can attack you for your lack of “diversity”. Damned if you do, damned if you don’t.

See? It’s a con game. The only way to win is to not play at all. Write what you want. Write what you think is awesome. Don’t let bullies scare you.

The sad truth is that what you actually put in the book is for the most part irrelevant to these people, because they’re just going to make up bullshit about it anyway. They don’t actually read much. See the talk above where the Fat Advocates were yelling at the skinny author and refusing to read her books, even though she was on their side. It came as a surprise to me and my readers when we were informed all my books were Manly White Men Having Manly White Adventure.

These critics don’t actually give a shit about anyone they claim to speak for. They’re not defending any underdogs. It is just a perpetual game of gotcha. They’re looking for reasons to be offended, because their culture equates being offended with being good. It’s all virtue signaling and posturing. And half the time they’re so damned ignorant they’re not even fluffing their feathers in the right direction.

For example, I wrote Son of the Black Sword. It is set in a fantasy world where the culture is based in large part on India and southeast Asia. I got one review from a culture warrior (on GoodReads obviously) where I was attacked because of my horrific stereotypes of Asians, and how I was so lazy that I didn’t even bother to do any research at all about different Asian cultures, because at the beginning I had some of the characters eating rice balls! And rice balls aren’t even Indian food!

Hmmm…. https://www.google.com/search?q=indian+rice+balls&biw=1366&bih=667&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj6pbChnY3PAhXBOj4KHUgJANcQ_AUIBigB

Disregarding that rather delicious looking Google image search, and the fact that in real life everybody who can grow rice figured out some way to squish it into a convenient clump, who is to say that the people of Lok didn’t culturally appropriate rice balls from somebody else before the rain of demons? It is after all, an imaginary place.

If I listened to these mopes, I never would have been able to write about Iron Guard Toru wearing samurai power armor bashing ninjas with a tetsubo, and that would make the world a much sadder place.

Cultural Appropriation is stupid when applied to the real world, and it becomes even dumber when they try to apply it to made-up worlds. If SJWs had their way we wouldn’t be able to write about somebody who looks slightly different than we do, how the hell do they expect us to write from the perspective of space aliens?

Cultural Appropriation is the stupidest argument ever.

 

What the Hoon?
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M. Kupari
Guest
M. Kupari
6 months 58 minutes ago

I wonder…is this why most of Stephen King’s characters were damaged authors from New England?

Christopher M. Chupik
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Christopher M. Chupik
5 months 27 days ago

It’s certainly the reason so many protagonists in literary fiction are middle-aged academics who cheat on their wives.

azazel
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azazel
5 months 27 days ago

That was the case since long before “cultural appropriation” became a term.

Mary
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Mary
5 months 24 days ago

But it is why they found it so easy to declare the rules. Having no ability to go beyond their present setting, it’s not a restriction on them.

Zeewulf
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Zeewulf
6 months 57 minutes ago

Don’t forget the catch 22, Larry–if you don’t write a sufficiently diverse and representative cast in the story, you’re also Hitler.

Guest
imnohbody
6 months 41 minutes ago

He did mention that, about half way down the article, in the paragraph starting with “So you don’t write about […]”.

M. Kupari
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M. Kupari
6 months 54 minutes ago
Second point: “taking intellectual property, traditional knowledge, cultural expressions, or artifacts from someone else’s culture without permission. This can include unauthorised use of another culture’s dance, dress, music, language, folklore, cuisine, traditional medicine, religious symbols, etc.” Who, exactly, has the authority to grant this permission? Who speaks for an entire culture, as if they’re a monolithic bloc who all hold the same opinions based on their backgrounds and ethnicity? That presumption is incredibly racist, yet it’s how the left sees the world sometimes: not as individuals, but as groups, who have attributes assigned to them based on their group identity.… Read more »
Kristophr
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Kristophr
5 months 26 days ago

Since my ancestors came out of Africa a hundred thousand years or so ago, damned near everyone on the planet is a relation of mine to some tiny extent.

I give everyone permission to use my cultures to create interesting things.

Except SJWs. They are appropriating my culture whenever they use any form of writing to communicate, and I require them to stop. They may bark incoherently, if they wish. I’ll allow that.

Kevin Findley
Guest
5 months 20 days ago

To bark incoherently, they’ll have to get permission from Hillary Clinton.

Randall Fitzgerald
Guest
5 months 25 days ago

That’s the deeply depressing part of the whole thing. The assumption, as far as I can tell, isn’t that there is one person to speak for an entire culture. It’s far worse.

The working idea is that if ANYONE with a claim to that culture is or would be upset by whatever you’ve said or done, then you’ve transgressed.

Doubly helpful because all you have to do is imagine a person who would be offended, and you don’t even have to check with anyone!

Pugmak
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Pugmak
5 months 25 days ago

Maybe there should be a movement to enforce a total non-cultural appropriation life style on those who whine about cultural appropriation.

A reserve could be established where they can spend the remainder of their lives trying to chase down their food and kill it with a rock or pointy stick, live in mud huts and cloth themselves in whatever skins they can tug off of dead critters.

I’m sure anthropologists and various branches of the psycho industry would appreciate such a situation for them to study, long term.

pohjalainen
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pohjalainen
5 months 20 days ago

Okay, I give you guys the permission to use a sauna, dive naked into freezing water in winter when you get out of said sauna (remember to cut the hole in ice first, diving head first into ice is not recommended) or roll in snow if swimming does not interest you, drink Koskenkorva, use a puukko and swear in Finnish. Since I am a certified Finn, birth certificate, passport and all, I can undoubtedly do that. 🙂

Kevin
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Kevin
6 months 50 minutes ago
I think it’s funny to see you and Moshe Feder (who’s clearly liberal) making similar points. You’re both right that the good parts of any culture should be appropriated by any other culture that wants! I think the universally acknowledged problem is that there are certainly people who depict a culture poorly and deserve to be mocked for it. I also think that everyone, including the SJWs, should be allowed to express that mockery. If you don’t like something, by all means write or talk or make signs about how you don’t like it. Or, even better, write a culture… Read more »
Christopher M. Chupik
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Christopher M. Chupik
5 months 27 days ago

Yeah, Moshe has been making sense lately. I know that doesn’t excuse what he said about us, but maybe he’s starting to see things differently.

Kevin
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Kevin
5 months 27 days ago

My impression is that he’s simply a complex human like most of us. Just because he agrees with the left on so many issues doesn’t mean he is in lockstep with them.

I don’t think he sees things differently than he used to so much as he’s not afraid to express his difference from them on the issue of the day. It’s a rather refreshing difference from so many on all sides who simply spout the rhetoric generated by a few leaders.

60guilders
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60guilders
5 months 27 days ago

I’m going to disagree with both of you. I think the Truesdale incident caused him to realize that some of the people on his side were, to put it mildly, delusional.
He probably has all of the same basic philosophical beliefs, but I think he’s twigged to the fact that his “side” may not be as clean as he’d like.

Kevin
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Kevin
5 months 27 days ago

That’s quite possible; I don’t know him personally, so I don’t know what he’s thinking beyond his posts on Facebook. In any case, I think it’s admirable that he’s maintained his position despite disagreeing vocally with lots of his own side. He certainly hasn’t been browbeaten into submission.

Member
5 months 27 days ago

… yet. They’ll try.

(WordPress login doesn’t seem to be working right…)

Doctor Locketopus
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Doctor Locketopus
5 months 27 days ago

I hope Feder is watching his back, career-wise.

Richard McEnroe
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Richard McEnroe
5 months 27 days ago

“I didn’t get a HARRUMPH! outta that guy!”
“Give the Publisher HARRUMPH!”
“HARRUMPH!”
“You watch your ass…!”

snelson134
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snelson134
5 months 25 days ago

Yeah, I find it fascinating that we’ve ceded them the right to decide if we’re allowed to work for a living by using the government legal system against private companies.

I find it even more fascinating that people don’t seem to realize that that makes what private companies are forced / choose to do by that government legal system’s penalties / incentives suitable First Amendment fodder.

Bjorn Hasseler
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Bjorn Hasseler
6 months 38 minutes ago

“Trigglypuff” – Whiny Pokémon evolved after midnight in the shadow of a special studies building cast by the full moon. Has a high-pitched shriek attack but is generally useless for fighting. Found mostly in Ivy League colleges and New York City publishing houses.

Patrick Chester
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Patrick Chester
5 months 27 days ago

Her singing is nonexistent and won’t put anyone to sleep. 🙂

F Harper
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F Harper
6 months 31 minutes ago

Look up Bre Fauchex on Twitter, maybe give her some likes and a follow. She came under attack from the SJW thought police recently for posting a video about “diversity” in fictional characters.

It’s the flip side of cultural appropriation, of course. Don’t write what you know, because that’s racist and erases colorful people, but you also can’t write about anyone outside your own culture, because that is cultural appropriation and also racist to colorful people.

Shawna
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Shawna
5 months 27 days ago
Your use of “colorful people” just made me think of something. The SJWs love to talk about “people of color” and how much better than whites they are. Except it’s kind of weird that color is only important to them when it’s skin and only in shades of brown. Because (short of highly unusual genetics) actual *color* in hair and eyes–colors other than brown/black, that is–is nearly exclusively a trait of white people. That’s why they think it’s so racist to show blonde or red hair or blue or green eyes as more beautiful (in any circumstance, when comparing any… Read more »
FeatherBlade
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FeatherBlade
5 months 26 days ago

So, refer to them as ” people of brown” instead?

It has trolling possibilities, I’ll give you that.

TXRed
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5 months 26 days ago

Many years ago I reduced a proto-SJ Activist to total confusion by arguing that if she was a Person of Color, then I was a Person of Pinkness. Or a Native American. Logic is such a wonderful thing. 🙂

Kristophr
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Kristophr
5 months 26 days ago

Personally, I revel in my Neanderthal heritage. Down with Homo Sapient aggression!

Shawna
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Shawna
5 months 26 days ago

I kinda like “people of earth tones”.

perturbed
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perturbed
5 months 25 days ago

Fifty shades of brown…

RIchard Paolinelli
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6 months 30 minutes ago

I’m Italian, my wife is Mexican and my son-in-law is Japanese. Look out SJWs I’m appropriatin’ all of this shit and there ain’t a damn thing you can do about it!!! lol

jungshin
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jungshin
5 months 27 days ago

I’m multi cultural: i fight like a Korean, curse like a German, drink like an Irishman!

Semiba
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Semiba
6 months 30 minutes ago
I have conflicting thoughts on this. 95% of me agrees whole heartedly, but the other 5% thinks there is a small point to be made, and that point hinges on sacred beliefs. Taking something sacred and respected from one culture and turning it into a crackerjack prize is not cool, and, really, the only leg “cultural appropriation” has to stand on. However, I think this might better fall under the “don’t be a scrub” point Larry made early on. Still, it’s a grey area where I think the rule of thumb to obey is, “Don’t be a jerky douchebag when… Read more »
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Robin Munn
6 months 7 minutes ago
95% of me agrees whole heartedly, but the other 5% thinks there is a small point to be made… I agree with you about sacred beliefs, but I won’t talk about that right now. I quoted this specific part of your sentence to make a different point. Whenever you find yourself saying or thinking something like this (I think there’s a small point to be made), be on the lookout for motte & bailey arguments. For example, you can start talking about how the whole cultural appropriation idea is stupid, and the SJW you’re arguing with will say, “So you’d… Read more »
pax
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pax
5 months 27 days ago

“Don’t be a jerky douchebag when handling the sacred beliefs of others.” — Unless, of course, those others are conservative Christians. In which case, jerky douchebaggery is the order of the day.

Synova
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Synova
5 months 27 days ago
A rule against treating sacred beliefs carefully and respectfully only exists as a rule if it applies to your own culture as well as all the other ones. But even that comes down to bad writing, doesn’t it? If the characters are individuals and real the rest follows relatively effortlessly. If the character is a shadow of their label, if they’re a hollow Shinto priest described lovingly or a hollow Catholic priest described hatefully, it’s equally bad writing if they have no actual identity. Shrivers mentions in her speech things that aren’t “identities”, and then lists the various things we… Read more »
Coop
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Coop
5 months 27 days ago

I generally just go by “If it’s not a religion or a uniform, it’s fair game.”

Which even then, most religions would be perfectly happy if everyone else adopted their stuff. That’s the whole point of missionaries.

Yu-Ain Gonnano
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Yu-Ain Gonnano
5 months 27 days ago

I am told that many Japanese stories use Christian symbols much the same way that American girls get tattoos of the Chinese character for “Soup”: It’s exotic and that makes it cool.

I’m perfectly fine with this. Some one, at some time, will be curious and look up what the symbols stand for. The more common it becomes, the more the Message will spread. Those who don’t bother to learn, wouldn’t have bothered anyway.

Leah
Guest
5 months 27 days ago

not just stories. there is a literal equivalent of popular t-shirts. http://twistedsifter.com/2014/11/japanese-discount-store-shirts-with-random-english-words/ and it gets about as hilarious as random kanji symbols on western t-shirts and tattoos, that wearer probably wouldn’t wear if they knew what it really meant (or they might wear it anyways, because it might actualy make it better in their eyes 🙂 .

Guest
Basara549
5 months 27 days ago
About 35 years ago (when I was a horny teen, and my collection of porn were mostly cast-offs from relatives magazines from ca. 1980 – remembered mainly from Khomeni winning Asshole of the year in one of the Hustlers), a PLAYBOY author wrote an article about the bizarre Japanese tendency to do this, including encountering an almost stereotypical shrunken up Japanese elderly woman wearing a T-shirt that had “HOT MILK” written across what should have been the breast area. This was, BTW, written during the period BEFORE when MHM: Grunge was set (the time period when Chad would have been… Read more »
FeatherBlade
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FeatherBlade
5 months 27 days ago

I do wonder about that… When I taught English in Japan, one of the students – a sweet, polite, conservative looking sort of gal – wore, on a couple of occasions, a Tshirt with horrifically obscene English on it.

FeatherBlade
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FeatherBlade
5 months 26 days ago

We were all afraid to ask her if they destroy what her shirt meant…

FeatherBlade
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FeatherBlade
5 months 26 days ago

*sigh* if they destroy = if she understood

Shawna
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Shawna
5 months 27 days ago

I really want that “Precise Dwarf Bravery” shirt. If I ever go to Japan, I’ll have to shop at one of these places.

Richard McEnroe
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Richard McEnroe
5 months 24 days ago

I made up an ICHIBAN SUKEBE GAIJIN T-shirt once, and yes, I know what it means…

Shadowdancer
Guest
5 months 24 days ago

BWA HA HA HA!

60guilders
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60guilders
5 months 27 days ago

One of the rules for Indian dances performed at Scouting events–which I’m pretty sure still happens–was that you weren’t allowed to do religious dances.
This struck me as being an eminently sensible proposition.

Tennessee Budd
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Tennessee Budd
5 months 27 days ago

How would the non-Indian scouts know the difference? A lot of Indian dances are religious, and a lot of others (of hope for hunting luck, of gratitude or just celebration of a great event) could be construed as having a religious aspect.
I see it differently. If I wanted to do a religious dance of my people, fuck anybody who doesn’t like it. It’s be boring anyway. I’m about 10% Indian, but Dad was Southern Baptist & Mom was Church of Christ. Reeeaally boring dance, but not tiring at all. I could stand there for a long time.

60guilders
Guest
60guilders
5 months 27 days ago

“How would the non-Indian scouts know the difference?”
You ask?
I get what you’re saying, but given that 90+% of Scouts aren’t Indian, and a higher percentage of aren’t animists, it’s not a bad rule of thumb.

BigFire
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BigFire
6 months 26 minutes ago

I don’t mind cultural appropriation. I just don’t like when a writer based their material on a cultural they haven’t had a clue about. Gun culture is an obvious starting point.

Shawna
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Shawna
5 months 27 days ago
I actually get this way with fanfic culture. There’s been a few books like “Fangirl” which are about fanfic writers, and I’ve hated them. Same with most video game books I read which don’t seem to understand gaming culture at all. The weird part is that in both of these cases, the authors usually claim to be (and for all I know, really are) part of these cultures. Which just means that their stories don’t ring as realistic to me based on my experiences with fanfic/gaming culture, whereas they apparently ring true to other people who have had different experiences… Read more »
Member
5 months 24 days ago

I’ve started books like that but stopped when I see that the author seems to be making fun of the group. It’s not a joke as one of the group, but against the group.

Leah
Guest
5 months 22 days ago
I’ve actualy read “Fangirl” and I found it pretty true to certain subset of fandom. it also happens to be a subset of fandom I have chosen not to engage in a long time after relatively short brush, but it IS a very large subset of fandom, comparatively speaking (and it exists not just for Harry Potter). (the accusation of plagiarism rang particularly true, because I have encountered it more than once as an attitude towards fan-fiction) so you are right about having different experiences coloring how one might describe them. I would be curious to read the gaming book… Read more »
Old NFO
Guest
6 months 20 minutes ago

This is another one of those YGTBSM speeches… sigh… And you’re right, as usual. So are we responsible to chase that ‘oriental’ character’s predecessors back to the dawn of mankind for ‘permission’? Or ask the Japanese if they got permission from Korea and China to ‘appropriate’ their cultures? Or ask the Maori and Zulu who took from who??? I’m going to write what I write. People can buy it or not… Sigh…

dmjole
Guest
6 months 19 minutes ago

Man, I am *so* dead if anybody finds out that I have an award-winning story in which the main character is a young black boy (!) who is a slave in Virginia (!!)– and I am neither of those things (!!!)
Then again, the story isn’t about “the black experience,” but it’s about human experience.

Richard McEnroe
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Richard McEnroe
5 months 27 days ago

I bet you’re not even from Virginia, h8er!

dmjole
Guest
5 months 26 days ago

How did you know?! I’ve never even BEEN to Virginia, not even in an airport!
I am SO guilty… I will take myself to the House of Pain right away.

Centurion13
Guest
5 months 24 days ago

Take yourself? Sounds like you are already there!

Carl \"Bear\" Bussjaeger
Guest
6 months 16 minutes ago

On the bright side of “cultural appropriation,” when some psychologically disturbed clown demands that I use his made-up pronouns for whatever imaginary gender, I can smile and say, “Oh, don’t worry; I would never do that. Adopting your pronouns in lieu of those standard American English pronouns of my culture would be to appropriate yours. I’m far too polite.”

Guest
jamesawolf
5 months 27 days ago

As a proud Zionist, I say we need to scream cultural appropriation when the BDS trots out the Israel/Nazi comparison canards.

Member
6 months 15 minutes ago

So, if cultural appropriation is bad, then what does that make the Chinese, who Sinicized the Xiongnu, or the Romans, who Romanized the Gauls? Does that make the conquered Xiongnu and Gauls bad guys for appropriating Chinese and Roman culture?

Christopher M. Chupik
Guest
Christopher M. Chupik
5 months 27 days ago

The Romans got their start stealing all the good stuff from the Greeks and Etruscans.

Robert Crawford
Guest
Robert Crawford
5 months 14 days ago

Turkish baths? Inherited from the Byzantines, who got it from their predecessors the Romans. The Romans apparently got the habit from the Carthaginians.

Bullfighting? Ever seen the Minoan paintings of “bull dancers”? The Carthaginians picked it up from their Phoenician forefathers, then carried it to Iberia, and the Spanish passed it along to the Mexicans.

And gladiator fights were the Roman adaptation of Etruscan funeral games, so not all they got from the Etruscans was good.

But the “cultural appropriation” ninnies would ignore the flow of human culture and leave us stagnant as little zoo exhibits rather than human beings.

Austin
Guest
Austin
6 months 9 minutes ago

I just want to say that cultural appropriation is awesome. I can culturally appropriate sushi one day, burritos the next, then pizza, empanadas, kababs… Seriously, it’s the best thing ever!

Shane
Guest
6 months 2 minutes ago

Damn Google Image search, now I’m hungry…

Mars Dorian
Guest
6 months 1 minute ago
Unfortunately, your post is necessary. Lionel Shriver’s line puts it best: ” Membership of a larger group is not an identity. Being Asian is not an identity. Being gay is not an identity. Being deaf, blind, or wheelchair-bound is not an identity, nor is being economically deprived.” It can be a part of your identity, but a human being is more then the sum of his parts. Most characters I write about have different cultures and come from different countries–it’s fun to write about other people. If I were to write only about my ‘kind of people’–straight white males from… Read more »
TheWriterInBlack
Guest
5 months 27 days ago
Any time anyone talks about “Cultural Appropriation” I am reminded of this scene from Fortune’s Stroke by Eric Flint and David Drake: Irene, as was her way, began with humor. “Consider these robes, men of India.” She plucked at a heavy sleeve. “Preposterous, are they not? A device for torture, almost, in this land of heat and swelter.” Many smiles appeared. Irene matched them with her own. “I was advised, once, to exchange them for a sari.” She sensed, though she did not look to see, a pair of twitching lips. “But I rejected the advice. Why? Because while the… Read more »
Thomas Hewlett
Guest
Thomas Hewlett
5 months 27 days ago

In the spirit of the passage, I’ll steal this and make it my own: “Just as we have taken everything we needed—and discarded anything we must—so that Fiction could endure.”

Doctor Locketopus
Guest
Doctor Locketopus
5 months 27 days ago
” but we in American have long followed the same concept, followed it and doubled down on it.” Yes, we do. If one looked into it deeply enough, you’d probably find out that is where the original Marxist behind the “cultural appropriation” crapola came up with it. Step 1: Find something that makes America (or Western Civilization in general) strong. Step 2: Invent some fucktarded rationale for why the thing in Step 1 is Bad, Bad, Bad. Step 3: Distribute the fucktarded theory in Step 2 to the SJW cult. It does not have to be a supportable theory. It… Read more »
Member
5 months 24 days ago

Marxists have a glass jaw. They accuse other people of things but can’t take examination of their beliefs. Marxism isn’t science it’s a cult. If you judge a belief by what actions are associated with it, Marxism is a bloody thing with nothing positive in it.

Member
5 months 26 days ago

Reminds me of the thesis of “How the West was Won”: http://slatestarcodex.com/2016/07/25/how-the-west-was-won/

“I am pretty sure there was, at one point, such a thing as western civilization. I think it involved things like dancing around maypoles and copying Latin manuscripts. At some point Thor might have been involved. That civilization is dead. It summoned an alien entity from beyond the void which devoured its summoner and is proceeding to eat the rest of the world.”

snelson134
Guest
snelson134
5 months 25 days ago
Kipling put it pretty well: “When ‘Omer Smote ‘Is Bloomin’ Lyre” INTRODUCTION TO THE BARRACK-ROOM BALLADS IN “THE SEVEN SEAS” When ‘Omer smote ‘is bloomin’ lyre, He’d ‘eard men sing by land an’ sea; An’ what he thought ‘e might require, ‘E went an’ took — the same as me! The market-girls an’ fishermen, The shepherds an’ the sailors, too, They ‘eard old songs turn up again, But kep’ it quiet — same as you! They knew ‘e stole; ‘e knew they knowed. They didn’t tell, nor make a fuss, But winked at ‘Omer down the road, An’ ‘e winked… Read more »
The Phantom
Guest
5 months 27 days ago
I spoted this on Farcebook earlier today, that is an excellent article. As a writer, I will damn well “appropriate” whatever I see fit. Otherwise known as “research” in civilized society. How else to incorporate the whole quiltbag when I’m only one cultural identity by myself? I’m more than happy to lock horns with anybody that tells me not to write Chinese characters, or Indian characters, or fricking Ancient Sumerian characters, because cultural appropriation. One does not accommodate people like that, one runs over them rough shot, then goes back and puts the boots to them. The very idea is… Read more »
Steve
Guest
5 months 27 days ago

Randomly, any association with ‘The Shadow’ on minds.com? Because that would be kind of awesome, IMHO.

The Phantom
Guest
5 months 27 days ago

Nope. But since you mention, I’ll go have a look.

Ashley
Guest
5 months 27 days ago

Couldn’t agree more.

elwood p. dowd
Guest
elwood p. dowd
5 months 27 days ago

Don’t forget the flipside: If you DON’T write about members of Class X, Y or Z (or more likely Class XYZ123§™) then you’re guilty of “erasure.” To enter the Theater of the Absurd that is all things SJW is always a lose-lose proposition.

TheWriterInBlack
Guest
5 months 27 days ago
On a somewhat related note, one of the reviews I got for Big Blue complained that “one of the subplots randomly became almost an ad for Christianity” (I had a character who was a devout Christian, who found strength in prayer and in helping others, and who refused to give up that faith despite some really nasty stuff going on.) Apparently in a major disaster of worldwide scope everyone is supposed to take a “God is dead” attitude and abandon all faith. This has not been what I’ve found in people of deep and abiding faith. Some may react that… Read more »
Shawna
Guest
Shawna
5 months 27 days ago

Some people are extremely intolerant of Christianity in fiction, especially when they’re not expecting it because it hasn’t been neatly shuffled off into the “Christian fiction” section where they can ignore it. I’ve seen reviews of books where just because the book has a Christian character who’s not evil and doesn’t abandon their faith, the reviewer has called the book “Christian propaganda”.

John R. Ellis
Guest
John R. Ellis
5 months 23 days ago

Yeah. I recall when the director of PIXAR’s WALL*E (Andrew Stanton) admitted that his Christian beliefs at least partially inspired some of the elements of his animated movie about cute robots, suddenly a whole bunch of Leftwingers who previously lauded the film had a mass freak-out and started bashing it as Evil Disguised Christian Brainwashing. *rolleyes*

Patrick Chester
Guest
Patrick Chester
5 months 23 days ago

Why am I reminded of the Bloom County strip where they found out playing Death Tongue’s records backwards resulted in them admonishing listeners to say their prayers, go to church, etc?

Randy P.
Guest
Randy P.
5 months 22 days ago

The same thing happened with Pete Docter when they learned he was a Christian. There’s gotta be propaganda in those Pixar films! Give me a break.

Guest
5 months 27 days ago

Spaniards don’t do culture appropriation. We do genocide.

And we like it.

BobtheRegisterredFool
Guest
BobtheRegisterredFool
5 months 27 days ago

And anyone who has a problem with it is racist.

McChuck
Guest
5 months 27 days ago

Spaniards are a cause of cultural appropriation in others. The survivors, anyways.

Yu-Ain Gonnano
Guest
Yu-Ain Gonnano
5 months 27 days ago

Yes.

As an American, “Appropriation” *is* my culture.

Hell, English doesn’t “borrow” words from other languages. It herds other languages into dark alleys, beats them up, and takes their words and tells them to keep their mouth shut about it.

Also, as an American, I think *your* culture would benefit greatly if you appropriated more of ours. Americans are givers like that.

Guest
Cameron
5 months 24 days ago

“Also, as an American, I think *your* culture would benefit greatly if you appropriated more of ours.”

We call it Western “Civilization” for a reason.

Guest
5 months 27 days ago
This is “write what you know” taken to a ridiculous extreme – write *only* what you know. Why can’t you *learn* and thus *know* about other people and things? I know what it’s like to be a Navy enlisted man for 22 years from head-cleaner through senior NCO (Senior Chief) and it was often fun in real life; it was quite often boring – and that which was not personally boring would be boring and excessively esoteric to tell. There’s a *reason* most Navy stories focus on officers (The Sand Pebbles notwithstanding); they are the focus of action and drama.… Read more »
LastRedoubt
Guest
LastRedoubt
5 months 27 days ago

And McCreepy (Jim Hines) and Kowal jump on the whole bandwagon, with Hines trying to risk the speech you mentioned.

Synova
Guest
Synova
5 months 27 days ago

Speaking of identities… if they didn’t jump on the bandwagon would they cease to exist entirely? *poof*

Kowal in particular seems all about who has permission to speak at all.

But Cultural Purifiers will Purify. Not much to do about that.

Member
5 months 24 days ago

It seems to be a case of: Those who can, do; Those who can’t, criticize, in hopes of immobilizing those who ca. It’s life lived as a crab bucket.

Tim H
Guest
5 months 27 days ago

Good to see The Guardian has actually learned something from their Tim Hunt clusterf**k, by printing the original speech in full rather than doubling down on the initial bullshit.

DeTroyes
Guest
DeTroyes
5 months 27 days ago
“SJWs got up in arms about white people wearing kimonos.” I suggest they should avoid anime and comics conventions. They’d be awful for their blood pressure. Lets see here… Alexander McCall Smith – White guy. Most popular series is about an African female detective in Botswana. James Patterson – White guy. Most popular series is about an African-American detective. Michael Chabon – White guy. Writes novels with African-American protagonists. Isuna Hasekura – Japanese writer. Most popular series takes place in late medieval Europe and with primarily German, French, and Nordic characters. And these are just off the top of my… Read more »
The Phantom
Guest
5 months 27 days ago

SJWs are doing their level best to -end- cosplay at conventions, witness the current pearl-clutching regarding cosplay weapons. It isn’t enough to peace-bond your plastic SAO Kirito sword, no no no. You cannot -have- a plastic sword at all, because running with scissors you know. Weapons are icky, can’t be allowed.

One need only view the ravings at Mr. 27 Hugos swamp to recognize the deep and driving need they have to make sure nobody is having any fun.

DeTroyes
Guest
DeTroyes
5 months 27 days ago

I try to avoid File 404 Sanity Not Found whenever possible. But honestly, the whole thing about weapons and cosplay has been going on for as long as I’ve been going to conventions (35+ years). It always seems to ebb and rebound in cycles, so much so that I’ve mostly stopped paying attention to it.

The Phantom
Guest
5 months 27 days ago
Christopher M. Chupik
Guest
Christopher M. Chupik
5 months 27 days ago

The SJW playbook:

1.) Identify something fun and popular.
2.) Take it over completely.
3.) Ruin it so that nobody enjoys it anymore.
4.) Repeat step 1.

Guest
imnohbody
5 months 27 days ago

And now NY ComicCon has prohibited having any fake weapons other than those made of foam or cardboard with costumes. I’m not much into cosplaying, but I do know that neither of those are all that well suited if you’re trying to accurately reproduce a work’s weaponry.

http://www.bleedingcool.com/2016/09/09/nyccs-weapons-policy-now-cardboard-and-foam-only-and-take-your-mask-off-when-you-come-in/

The Phantom
Guest
5 months 26 days ago

They’re going to have some trouble with that ‘take-the-mask-off’ thing if any Mooselimb chicks show up.

Richard McEnroe
Guest
Richard McEnroe
5 months 25 days ago

Mess with their heads. Dress as a Fremen from Dune.

perturbed
Guest
perturbed
5 months 25 days ago

I gather we are talking about the man-burka version rather than the David Lynch film version. *evil grin*

Richard McEnroe
Guest
Richard McEnroe
5 months 25 days ago

When Glamdring is outlawed only outlaws will have Glamdring.

snelson134
Guest
snelson134
5 months 25 days ago

And if you look at the comments, there’s a plurality that want to ban cosplay altogether.

Shadowdancer
Guest
5 months 24 days ago

How in the everliving fuck were they going to achieve that? By telling people ‘you’re not allowed to dress like that?’ In the US? really?

I’d LOVE to see them try to take on reinactors.

Patrick Chester
Guest
Patrick Chester
5 months 23 days ago

Okay, I just had an amusing thought of Civil War re-enactors being called cosplayers.

Then I thought of cosplayers re-enacting battles from the works of fiction they’re portraying. Though I guess anything with giant mecha might be difficult to pull off. 😀

Richard McEnroe
Guest
Richard McEnroe
5 months 23 days ago

‘Fix! Bayonets! MOVE!’

FeatherBlade
Guest
FeatherBlade
5 months 24 days ago

Hmmm…. Now I could be wrong about this, but doesn’t cosplay tend to be a more female-dominated way of displaying one’s knowledge of and love for the characters of one’s preferred fandom?

I’m shocked that NYCC would even consider a policy that suppresses the voices and self-expression of female fans in such a disproportionate manner.

/sarc,notsarc

60guilders
Guest
60guilders
5 months 24 days ago

Threy’re not expressing themselves in the right way, donchaknow.

Patrick Chester
Guest
Patrick Chester
5 months 22 days ago

All that aggressive cleavage and navel is a scary expression to some folks. 😉

Member
5 months 24 days ago

It’s not about the supposed but rather a way to control other people and virtue signalling.

Robert Crawford
Guest
Robert Crawford
5 months 14 days ago

Drop them at Pennsic. They’ll either get over their phobia or end up catatonic.

Synova
Guest
Synova
5 months 27 days ago

The kimono thing was an art install in Boston of a Monet painting with the chance to try on a kimono one day a week. Outrage ensued. Counter protests by Japanese ensued. The display was removed. Japanese in Japan found it all confusing and stupid.

Guest
wyrdbard
5 months 27 days ago

They also don’t realize the significance of just about anything. Kimonos are Japanese formal wear. It’s no more cultural appropriation for us to wear one of them than for someone from Japan to wear an evening gown or prom dress.

Joe in PNG
Guest
Joe in PNG
5 months 27 days ago

Heck, Japanese hotel rooms give you a yukata (an informal wear kimono, kind of like PJ’s) for free.
Don’t they know that they’re playing into their own cultural appropriation?

TheWriterInBlack
Guest
5 months 27 days ago

Is it cultural appropriation when I wear the Japanese clothes my wife (Japanese immigrant from Japan) gave me?

Richard McEnroe
Guest
Richard McEnroe
5 months 27 days ago

When it’s the schoolgirl uniform, yeah, little bit.

S1AL
Guest
S1AL
5 months 27 days ago

On multiple levels.

Joe in PNG
Guest
Joe in PNG
5 months 27 days ago

Well, they did steal those from Europe…

Richard McEnroe
Guest
Richard McEnroe
5 months 25 days ago

TheTentacle Hell of St. Trinian’s!

Guest
Cameron
5 months 24 days ago

And that is what we call “Nightmare Fuel” around these parts.

Shadowdancer
Guest
5 months 24 days ago

REAL nightmare fuel:

Take tentacles, and instead of the nubile nymphs usually portrayed, insert the average American feminist like Trigglypuff.

Patrick Chester
Guest
Patrick Chester
5 months 23 days ago

*rolls SAN*

AIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIGHHHH!!!!

*face melts like that scene from Raiders of the Lost Ark*

Richard McEnroe
Guest
Richard McEnroe
5 months 23 days ago

Demon Beast KIng: “I’m gonna need sake and keep it coming. Oh, and a blindfold. Earplugs…”

Patrick Chester
Guest
Patrick Chester
5 months 23 days ago

Demon Beast King: “Suddenly I’m wondering why we go after human females…”

Richard McEnroe
Guest
Richard McEnroe
5 months 21 days ago

“I’m wondering if we really caught one, sama…”

Richard McEnroe
Guest
Richard McEnroe
5 months 27 days ago

Actually some people culturally appropriate trousers better than others. Head uptown and youy’ll notice many of them have neglected the cultural notions of belts or waist sizes…

Member
5 months 27 days ago

Guess Harriet Beecher Stowe should have been too ashamed to write Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

Member
5 months 27 days ago

BTW isn’t she culturally appropriating the English language?

Christopher M. Chupik
Guest
Christopher M. Chupik
5 months 27 days ago

Me: a Canadian of Ukrainian-Polish-British extraction.

My last three protagonists: Elderly Texan veteran, posthuman female entity, Hispanic female space pilot.

I think my writing would be pretty dull if I only wrote about myself.

BobtheRegisterredFool
Guest
BobtheRegisterredFool
5 months 27 days ago
1. People complaining about appropriation are doing so from a perspective alien to historical English speakers. The complainers are engaging in appropriation, not okay, and need to find another language to bitch in. (It needs to be a conlang that they have clear title to.) 2. This especially came up during Black Lives Matter. American policing was heavily influenced by 19th British policing, which was adapted from French policing. (British didn’t consider French practices appropriate for a free people.) Apparently this somehow is not culturally authentic for certain American demographics. Fortunately, if one goes back thousands of years, there are… Read more »
John Ringo
Guest
5 months 27 days ago

No cultural appropriation? Okay. We go back to the 1950s. All women are hereby ordered to wear hats and gloves when out of the house. In the house is where they are required to spend most of their time. All food is to be boiled. No chocolate, tea or coffee allowed. Or OJ or refined sugar. Nicotine. (Native Americans.) Wait. No pants. Invented by the Huns, culturally appropriated by the Chinese and then by Westerners during the Renaissance. So 1950s but everyone in skirts. I’m good. Got kilts. Even suit kilts.

BobtheRegisterredFool
Guest
BobtheRegisterredFool
5 months 27 days ago

I don’t have any long grey flannel skirts that flatter the male body.

Richard McEnroe
Guest
Richard McEnroe
5 months 26 days ago

“No, no, no, these aren’t hakama! These are…uh…these are…Flemish leg blouses, yeah, that’s it!”

The Phantom
Guest
5 months 27 days ago

Kilts and Claymores, and painting yourself blue for the weekly punch up over whose sheep that is.

Richard McEnroe
Guest
Richard McEnroe
5 months 27 days ago

AR15s and REAL claymores and I can haz ALL the sheep.

Joe in PNG
Guest
Joe in PNG
5 months 27 days ago

Ya, I’ve noticed that those who whine loudest about cultural appropriation tend to practice it quite a bit.
But, as is usual with SJW’s, It’s Not (bad thing) When They Do It!

LVTony
Guest
LVTony
5 months 27 days ago

Something that goes right along with kilts and the food appropriations Larry mentioned is something I heard on the British show QI. Tikka Misala was invented by a Pakistani chef in Glasgow. Apparently a customer wanted some “sauce” for his chicken and the chef whipped some up and named it Tikka Misala.

Archer
Guest
5 months 27 days ago

As they say, “Those who can, do. Those who can’t, teach.”

We should add, “Those who can’t do either, join a SJW mob and whine about successful people’s ‘insensitivities’ to your just-as-useless-as-you friends.”

John R. Ellis
Guest
John R. Ellis
5 months 27 days ago
Using SJW logic, my favorite comic book of all time, USAGI YOJIMBO, is the most evil, cultural appropriationist swill ever, because writer and illustrator Stan Sakai Hawaiian Japanese and freely took inspiration from the works of Evil Straight White Male American Cartoonists like Carl Barks and Walt Kelly along with Akira Kurosawa. Plus he’s not a humanoid rabbit from a fantastical alternate Earth’s variant of 16th century Japan! …..guess he’ll have to give all his devoted fans a mea culpa and start writing about the time he used to letter the Sunday edition of the “Spider-Man” newspaper strip for Stan… Read more »
John R. Ellis
Guest
John R. Ellis
5 months 27 days ago

What I wouldn’t give for an “edit” button. That’s supposed to read “is Hawaiian Japanese”

Larry Graves
Guest
Larry Graves
5 months 27 days ago

White Guilt Complex is an ugly, debilitating affliction. Thank Gawd it is mostly contained and limited to liberals and idiots. Too bad it isn’t fatal (yet)….

Christopher M. Chupik
Guest
Christopher M. Chupik
5 months 27 days ago

Example: recent remarks by John Scalzi.

Guest
Mrs. John C. Wright
5 months 27 days ago
Hear, hear! Thank you, Larry! This definitely has to be the most addle-headed of all addle-headed ideas. So I have noticed, according to the progressives: You can’t write about white people. Too many stories about white people. You can’t write about people not from your culture. Huh… so, in other words, they want us to shut up. Won’t happen. The one that made me laugh the most was the article that accused J.K. Rowling of Culturally Appropriating American Indian lore (it said religion) and “Taking shelf space from people of color.” And I thought: which scenario sounds more likely. You… Read more »
Bugmaster
Guest
Bugmaster
5 months 27 days ago
To be fair, though: …Or take a goodthink peacenik author who has never served a day in the military, and they can write their blood thirsty, ticking time bombs of PTSD addled murder rage, and that’s perfectly cool. Christians? All up in your literature, as long as they are bad guys. We don’t hate characters like that because they are appropriating our culture. We hate them because they are lame, boring stereotypes written out of obvious lazy ignorance. As far as I understand, this is exactly how the SJWs feel when a white man writes a story about a black… Read more »
BobtheRegisterredFool
Guest
BobtheRegisterredFool
5 months 27 days ago

They might have grounds for that belief if everyone and their dog wrote, say, a standardized ‘welfare queen’ stock character for all of their female black characters. Especially with a stock subplot of “negligent parenting causes child’s death, blames others and kicks up a fuss demanding justice”.

Porn is dull if you aren’t into it. A bunch of stories with the same stock characters leading to the same ‘surprises’ gets there.

You could say that a female black character who doesn’t address the political topic of the day is necessarily a stock caricature to such a leftist.

Bugmaster
Guest
Bugmaster
5 months 27 days ago
Well, as far as I understand, SJWs believe that black people are fundamentally different from white people due to all the historic oppression. Therefore, a white person cannot possibly understand the experience of being a black person well enough to write about it. Thus, if a white person does create a black character, there’s no way that character would ever be anything more than a distorted caricature. I personally think this viewpoint is, to put it politely, total nutballs; but as far as I can tell, at least some SJWs do sincerely believe it. Thus, they experience the same severely… Read more »
BobtheRegisterredFool
Guest
BobtheRegisterredFool
5 months 27 days ago
Suppose I believe that drug users are inhuman. Does that mean I would have grounds to object whenever drug users are represented as other than corpses animated by demons? The useful narrative has been Christians, rednecks, et cetera really want to do things, so that the danger needs addressing with governmental force. Compare numbers of rednecks versus numbers of incidents. The most minority neighborhoods have burned has been incidents like Ferguson and Baltimore. There haven’t been enough massacres. Said narrative is pushed by people who can’t stand disagreement, and want to escalate. Repeating it is boring except for masturbators.