Monster Hunter Nation

Sad Puppies BOOK BOMB! Best Related Work and Campbell Award for Best New Writer

BOOK BOMB!

This is our last Sad Puppies 3 Book Bomb. Remember, you’ve only got a few more days to get your nominations in for the Hugo awards.

If you are just joining us, a Book Bomb is where we get as many people as possible to get a book on Amazon on the same day, in order to spike the sales rating as high as possible, so that it will end up on some bestseller lists and show up in front of all new readers who wouldn’t normally see it.  Success breeds success, and the author gets new fans.

The Sad Puppies bombs are special because these are the works in the different categories that the Evil Legion of Evil has put forth as suggestions for our Hugo nomination slate. The last two we did went amazing.

Note, not all of these are available on Amazon. If that is the case then we put a link to where you can get it, or something else, so that the author can GET PAID. 🙂

**Best Related Work** 

This is one of those weird little catch all categories that is often dominated by some really cliquish nonsense. We’ve got some big brain essays, hard science, philosophy, military strategy, and of course Mad Mike.

Transhuman

*****
The Hot Equations: Thermodynamics and Military SF
[Kindle Edition]
by Ken Burnside

RidingTheRedHorse

*****
Wisdom From My Internet
[Kindle Edition]
by Michael Z. Williamson

WisdomFromMyInternet

*****

LettersFromGardner

*****

Why Science is Never Settled
Part 1, Part 2
by Tedd Roberts (BAEN)

*****
**The John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer**
The Campbell isn’t actually a Hugo, but is nominated and voted on at the same time, and the award is given at the same time, so it is pretty much the Hugo for best new author. This is the one that I came in dead last for, which was lucky because we were warned if I had won it would have ended literature forever.

Kary English

*****

Eric S Raymond

*****

Jason Cordova

Edit: I accidentally put up the wrong book for Jason Cordova at first. The publisher actually put this one on sale for today’s Book Bomb.

*****
Remember, Amazon has changed how they calculate the sales rank. There is a long delay now. We won’t see any ranking movement until this evening, and hit the highs during the night or tomorrow morning. That has turned out okay because it just gives the authors more attention later. I’ll put the initial rankings up here in a minute.
Transhuman and Subhuman: Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #174,347 Paid in Kindle Store
Riding the Red Horse: Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #43,475 Paid in Kindle Store
Wisdom from My Internet: Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #43,295 Paid in Kindle Store
Letters from Gardner: Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,066,078 in Books
Flight of the Kikayon: Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,432,174 Paid in Kindle Store
Kaiju Apoclypse: Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #315,080 in Books
EDIT: It is now tomorrow. Let’s see how we did:
Transhuman and Subhuman:

Riding the Red Horse:

Wisdom from my Internet

Letters from Gardner

Flighty of the Kikayon

Kaiju Apocalypse

Good work. 🙂

That’s it. No more Book Bombs. I know you guys are tired.

Remember that there are only a few days left to get your nominations in!

Reminder, Kickstarters with me in them!
Sad Puppies short story update, free Championship B'tok and Tuesdays with Molakesh eligibility
Michael Z. Williamson
Guest

You can also order direct from my site here:

http://www.michaelzwilliamson.com/bibliography-Wisdom%20from%20My%20Internet-book.html

And I hope to have a paper edition (limited run) out in a couple of months.

Milo
Guest

This is the first Book Bomb I’ve participated in and I wanted to say I think it’s an awesome way to go about getting authors credit and, of course, PAID,

Malcolm Edwards
Guest

I am genuinely bemused at the absence from your slate of the second (and concluding) volume of Bill Patterson’s biography of Robert Heinlein, surely the most substantial work of non-fiction published last year.

Brad R. Torgersen
Guest

I’d have happily considered it for SP3, alas, nobody pinged me on it. With so much fiction and non-fiction available each year, sometimes we need help knowing what’s worth noticing. I wish somebody would have pointed a (virtual) finger at this volume and said, “Hey, look!” Having said that, I think Wright’s book a very strong related work. As is Lou Antonelli’s. Hell, they’re all strong. Otherwise they’d not be on the list. I am bummed to have missed the Heinlein bio, though. Sorry!

ratseal
Guest

Mea culpa. I have both volumes in hardback, and it is a great piece of work. I feel like cr*p for neglecting this obvious, excellent candidate.

Lou Antonelli
Guest

I think the main purpose of the Sad Puppies is to draw attention to works that might otherwise be overlooked. I think the Heinlein biography is a case where it will probably be on the ballot on its own merits and doesn’t need a boost. I’d be very surprised if it ISN’T on the ballot.

Kary English
Guest

Thanks again to Larry, Brad and all of the Puppies! I think this crowd will like Kikayon. It’s a stand-alone novelette that previously appeared in The Grantville Gazette, but it’s *also* a sequel to Totaled, set some 200 years after Totaled ends.

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[…] (Vox) Larry Correia has posted the third and last of the 2015 Sad Puppies Book Bombs, this one for Related Works and the Campbell nominees:BOOK […]

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[…] Larry Correia has posted the third and last of the 2015 Sad Puppies Book Bombs, this one for Related Works and the Campbell nominees: […]

Russell
Guest

Already purchased both “Riding the Red Horse” and “Transhuman and Subhuman” and they are both EXCELLENT. I’ll try and get reviews of them up later today.

Patrick Richardson
Guest

Reblogged this on and commented:
BOOK BOMB!!!

warpcordova
Guest

Thanks for the Book Bomb, Larry. The publisher of the Kaiju Apocalypse series made every single Kaiju book I’ve written available on Kindle for $0.99. He really likes you guys.

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[…] Sad Puppies BOOK BOMB! Best Related Work and Campbell Award for Best New Writer […]

mwdeans
Guest

Reblogged this on Tech-Horizon and commented:
Awesome books

Mike Glyer
Guest

Malcolm Edwards makes a good point, and far be it from me to cause any of your wrath to be undeservedly deflected onto the late Bill Patterson’s excellent Heinlein bio, however, I pointed out that very same omission in my February 2 article about Sad Puppies 3 that you complained about but refused to read — http://monsterhunternation.com/2015/02/02/sad-puppies-3-the-slatening/#comment-105299

James May
Guest

We apply a social justice warrior bigotry algorithm to any work: white straight male – multiply by 100. Everyone else- divide by 100. Anything having to do with Heinlein is ineligible. We’re not actually voting for any of this stuff. We’re just pretending what we would vote for if we weren’t all such incredible racists. Most of us in fact are in retreat, checking our privilege at a secluded Shaolin Temple and reading the collected works of Octavia Butler. Luckily the privilege sweat-lodge has wi-fi.

Brad R. Torgersen
Guest

Actually, now that I think about it, if we had run with the Heinlein bio, all the Heinlein haters on the Left (and they are legion) would have been crying about how we’re just using the slate to push Heinlein again; because all right-wingers are slavish devotees of Heinlein, and therefore we’re somehow bad. John Scalzi even said so. And Scalzi is never wrong. (blinks eyes stupidly)

James May
Guest
That’s the first thing that came to my mind. The cross-hairs never waver – not for a minute. The straight white man loses coming and going in the stacked deck behind social justice warrior ideology. Observation and self-contradicting facts come later, or usually not at all. It’s an ideology of straw men. For example Gould’s retweeting the usual garbage “Each time I hear women can’t write vast space operas, Friedman & Cherryh instantly come to mind.” Well, Google “Women Can’t Write Space Opera” and all you’ll find is social justice warriors asserting straight white men say that, but not them… Read more »
Tully
Guest

You have a point there, Brad, but they already shot down Volume 1 with extreme prejudice, so I’m guessing it really wouldn’t have changed the results from that particular quarter. I’m just being noisy about it being worthy at this point.

And yes, I should have been more vocal about it earlier in the process., and Larry is correct that it’s going to get plenty of nom votes on its own merit without any added push.

Andrew
Guest

I’m never going to understand how these people hate the guy who wrote about hippy free love Martian Jesus.

Khazlek
Guest
I’m never going to understand how these people hate the guy who wrote about hippy free love Martian Jesus. Well for starters, in that very volume on the subject of homosexuality: “Jill suspected that Mike would grok a ‘wrongness’ in the poor in-betweeners anyhow–they would never be offered water.” and one “you suck” cancels 20 atta-boys. So the different outlook of the characters in Time Enough for Love doesn’t help. There is also considerable anger about Heinlein’s female characters, and then don’t forget the nipples that went spung! in Number of the Beast. I do wonder what he might do… Read more »
ratseal
Guest

Doubtless the open minded, fair and just crew at SFWA that celebrated No White Male authors in the previous Hugo honoree line up will ensure careful consideration and promotion of Mr. Patterson ‘ s work.

Murgy
Guest

Bwaahahaha! Oh, you kidder!
Best joke I’ve read, today.

James May
Guest

That was the Nebulas. Read this if you want the delusional female supremacist take on how the bestest won the Nebulas because the stories “were not the standard Anglostraightmale heroes.” There’s the politicized lesbian definition of “quality.”

http://thebooksmugglers.com/2014/05/sff-in-conversation-athena-andreadis-on-lest-we-forget-in-the-wake-of-this-years-nebula-awards.html

These are some truly daffy people.

Khazlek
Guest

Doubtless the open minded, fair and just crew at SFWA that celebrated No White Male authors in the previous Hugo honoree line up will ensure careful consideration and promotion of Mr. Patterson ‘ s work.

As James May pointed out, SFWA awards the Nebula, not the Hugo. There isn’t a Nebula for related work.

For the Hugo, the careful consideration comes from the Hugo voters, who are the attending members and supporting members of Worldcon. If you aren’t one, you can become one, though it’s too late for the nomination stage, you could still vote on the final ballot.

ratseal
Guest

@ James, @ Khazlek – thank you for the correction and clarification. FWIW, I am confident that the good folks that celebrated the absence of white male authors from the ’14 Nebulas and chose to nominate for the ’15 Hugos will surely have overlooked Patterson’s race and sex and suggested his work on its merits.

That way, despite it’s absence on the Slatening, we can still vote for it.

Right?

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Doug Northcote
Guest

Got what I didn’t have already. Sorry Mike and Tom, I don’t let the grass grow very long before I buy your books.

Thanks for the new good ideas. I hadn’t known of the biography either, so that will be on the list for later this year.

The numbers are updating faster again? The Transhuman is now at #5600, and number 1, 2, and 3 in the selected genre per the site.

All of the books look like they’ve gotten a serious kick in the pants up already from ratings.

Reviews and stars after reading of course.

Bill S
Guest

Cordova, English and Burnside taken care of.

Author Lou Antonelli
Guest

“Letters from Gardner” is up 929,363 Amazon ranks today.

James May
Guest
Just read another Nebula-nominated short. It’s yet another in the brand new sub-genre of intersectional feminist racial and sexual revenge fantasies. This time men rape and sell mermaids to be eaten as food. A mermaid grants a wish to a 15 yr. old girl that all the “rape culture” men in the story should die, which includes her own family. Beer-gardens, start your engines. In a post about the story, the gay author Alyssa Wong (you can see her essay in the QUEERS DESTROY SCIENCE FICTION Kickstarter) hints “a field that was once very white and male” is the opposite… Read more »
Jackson Carberry
Guest

Got a name for this story?

A. Nagy
Guest

I wonder if amazon delayed their ratings to prevent…fake book bombs. I don’t think it was book bombs though as much as other stuff, I think they delayed it to prevent temporary buys>cancels in order to temporarily boost ratings. Now they delay it until it’s too late to cancel or at least cancel easily.

Khazlek
Guest
Should we be surprised the story was written at an actual Clarion Writers’ Workshop, or that her instructors were Andy Duncan and Nalo Hopkinson, or that Duncan co-wrote the anti-white Nebula-nominated “Wakulla Springs”? Anti-white? I think that may be a bit over the top. Spoilers follow, but I doubt anyone here is dying to read it. Wakulla Springs is a meandering thing in which stuff starts to happen near Wakulla Springs and then it cuts away to a new scene years later. It does this two or three times and nothing much that happens ever gets resolved in a way… Read more »
James May
Guest

Context and motive are everything. A museum with a confederate flag is quite different from the home of a KKK member which has one.

“Wakulla Springs” is an analogy to the KKK member’s home. Turtledove is the museum. Comparing the two is pointless.

Khazlek
Guest
I’ll be happy to compare the two. The Turtledove has a plot. 🙂 I think by motive you are saying that Turtledove didn’t intend to portray all white men as racists and sexists and the authors of Wakulla spring did. I didn’t spot that in the text. Perhaps, since you know more about the authors than I do, that you are employing knowledge outside the text. I’d rather not take that approach; it sounds like that Radish Reviews argument that there was no point in reading the Sad Puppy nominees because they were all fascists. I’m not sure where you… Read more »
James May
Guest
I wouldn’t know where to start to elaborate. The Radish Reviews “argument” is not an argument at all, since it’s all made up bullshit straw men in scare quotes. SJWs in essence are enrolling us in an ideology they consider an opposite to theirs but which doesn’t exist. It’s not like they don’t have blogs to make a case for it and use quotes. They have none and no case to make. Comparing me to that oafish bag of wind is idiotic. She pre-bans commenters and some of her favorites are hate-Tweeters like Veronica Schanoes, who is only slightly less… Read more »
Jackson Carberry
Guest

You’re talking about morons who’ve banned Frank Frazetta cuz sexism and patriarchy.

It could be argued that a book does not need an illustration of a scantily clad woman with a sword (or just a scantily-clad women being saved by a big, hulking male warrior) on its cover. Frazetta did that, and people don’t like that these days, so he gets called on that (not that I necessarily agree, or course.)

Khazlek
Guest
However they do make sense to the people voting for them, who are ironically honoring what is outside the text more than what is within. Similarly, it seems to me that a declaration that Wakula Springs is anti-white criticizes the book more for what is outside the text that what is within, and it got on the Hugo and Nebula short lists more for what is outside the text than within. That is why I brought up the Radish Reviews, because she planned to no-award all Sad Puppies nominees based only on considerations outside the text. I grant that unlike… Read more »
James May
Guest
My criticism of SJW affirmative action is usually more along the lines of what’s outside the text in terms of the race and sex of the author and so the quality of the story. When N.K. Jemisin and Saladin Ahmed were nominated for Nebulas there was nothing anti-anything in the work itself. They shifted locale and race but didn’t go after anyone in the stories. The work wasn’t hateful it just wasn’t very good. Ancillary Justice isn’t hateful. But I have noticed this sub-genre I call racial revenge fantasies creeping into the picture. They always take place in the past,… Read more »
Achillea
Guest

“I think where James’ complaint enter the picture, isn’t in the writing, but the reading. How did this barely-a-fantasy end up on the short lists for both Hugo and Nebula?”

This was my problem with Wakulla Springs, as well. On a technical level, it was well-written (albeit somewhat meandering and lacking much in the way of dramatic tension). Had it been nominated for a non-SFF award, I would’ve voted for it in a heartbeat. But a Hugo or Nebula? No. It wasn’t a genre piece.

James May
Guest
“Wakulla Springs” was lazy satire and a good idea 60 years too late. If I’m inspired by the ha-ha effect of pink flamingos on suburban lawns and the world’s largest ball of twine I need to do something with that, shift the perspective. Instead Duncan and Klages literally gave us the twine and flamingos. Why not put it on another planet in the future? That’s what SF does; it reflects the essence of a thing back at us. I already know what kitsch is, give me something different. Worse is the social commentary. If there was a worthwhile message or… Read more »
John Layton
Guest
I haven’t followed the Hugo thing much except for this year, but the anti-Heinlein thing leaves me dumbfounded. Over the years I have literally read all his work multiple times, and I still read his YA stuff again every few years with the comforting familiarity of an old friend who helped me develop my own moral barometer when I was young (which is apparently evil and outdated now?) How can anyone argue that they want diversity and differing perspectives in science fiction and do anything but tip their hat to Heinlein. His characters were incredibly socially progressive by today’s standards,… Read more »
Khazlek
Guest

Yep, there’s your problem. Heinlein Haters tend to not see TANSTAAFL as a positive message.

John Layton
Guest

But science fiction writers hating Heinlein is like scientologists hating L. Ron Hubbard. Or an engineer refusing to use geometry because they hate Greek people.

And stranger because SF/F is the “misfit” genre, and they are preaching acceptance. Does Sue Grafton hate Dashiell Hammett? I’ve never heard Terry Pratchett express a desire to kick P.G. Wodehouse’s ass. From an outsider’s perspective this looks like it boils down to “They want to steal our rocket statues!!!”.

On a separate note I’ve enjoyed reading “the Fisk of God”‘s archives almost as much as the MHI books.

Khazlek
Guest

But science fiction writers hating Heinlein is like scientologists hating L. Ron Hubbard. Or an engineer refusing to use geometry because they hate Greek people.

I don’t agree. Heinlein casts a huge shadow over the field, but you can like him or not like him, whether you are a writer or not.

James May
Guest
You’re assuming the core ideology which judges Heinlein does so out of logic and politics rather than a biological hatred. At best Heinlein is an “ally,” a broken thing that can never be truly fixed and fit only to “#justlisten” and then carry water. Heinlein committed too many other sins (Sixth Column, Farnham’s Freehold, etc.) to even be an “ally.” To an intersectionalist he was a broken clock right twice a day to be otherwise reviled as an ethnic European heterosexual male who benefitted from privilege, patriarchy and settler colonialism. I am paraphrasing rhetoric straight from the horses’ mouth. Heinlein’s… Read more »
Khazlek
Guest

You can’t understand it. They don’t read.

Whether they read or not, they don’t read much Heinlein. He’s been gone since 1988. It’s been twice as long since Stranger in a Strange Land.

James May
Guest

A elite group of connoisseurs acts like a curatorship that creates the benchmarks for “this is what is good.” A readership bereft of that creates a Tower of Babel where anything is anything. An unprincipled ideological agenda creates garbage. Modern SF has gone from the first to the third phase and is heading to who knows what; dissolution perhaps.

Core SFF as represented by the Hugos and Nebulas today are to old SFF what Penelope Pitstop/Wacky Races is to Warner Bros. cartoons.

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[…] want to see more widely read. There is some proof of this, since they recently pushed a series of “book bombs” for their slate, and profess to be happy with the results. There’s nothing wrong with that; […]

correia45
Guest

I sold like 2,000 novellas that week. Yeah. I “profess” to be happy with that. 🙂

James May
Guest

Hahah. Schanoes read about herself and I went straight to – surprise – a “right-winger.” It never occurs to people that daily sociopathic Twitter rants that last months that are anti-white, anti-male, anti-heterosexual and anti-Christian don’t even qualify for “left-wing,” or even politics at all. “Issues” is the most polite way to describe it.

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